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Brake Parts and How They Work Together to Stop a Vehicle

Technical Bulletins

Jul 16, 2019

Welcome to Bendix brakes, today we will look at how a modern disc brake system works. We will start by looking at the braking components involved in stopping a vehicle and how they work together.

Starting with one of the main components in the braking system we look at the disc rotor which the brake pads squeeze against, this will create friction that decelerates the rotation of the wheel and vehicle.

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The caliper is activated by brake fluid hydraulic pressure produced from the vehicles brake pedal and master cylinder. In this assembly the brake pads are squeezed up against the disc rotor surface to create friction.

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Brake Caliper Assembly

A caliper is made up of multiple parts all crucial in effective operation of the brake system. These parts include the caliper and mounting bracket, slide pins, locking bolts, dust boots, brake mounting clips, brake pads and shims, the brake piston with dust boot and seal.

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The caliper is fed brake fluid through a banjo fitting which drives the piston forward towards the inside brake pad when the brake pedal is pushed. This causes the caliper to move along the slide pins which then pulls the outside brake pad up against the brake disc rotor.

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Now that we understand the parts lets see how the braking system works. When the brake pedal is pressed the caliper will receive high pressure brake fluid from the master cylinder which will push the piston into the inside brake pad and onto the disc rotor surface. Hydraulic pressure will cause the caliper to move along the slide pins pulling the outer brake pad against the opposite side of the disc rotor causing friction and decelerating the brake and the vehicle.

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Looking at the braking process from another angle we can see the brake fluid pushing the piston which in turn pushes the inner brake pad against the inside of the disc rotor, once this has happened the fluid will now push the caliper along the slides and the outer brake pad will be pulled towards the opposite side of the disc rotor.

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  • Bendix Brake Pads Technical Bulletin How Brake Pads Work Prj 07359 2019
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